The Glenwood Post Independent published an article on 4TGP's recent trip to Kenya in the On Sunday, Oct. 18, edition of the newspaper. You can read an excerpt below.

For The Good Period Executive Director Kayce Anderson shares a smile with young girls in the village of Mugatuni, Kenya, during a game of Hokey Pokey. The game served as an ice-breaker place at the beginning of a pad distribution and education session. For the Good distributed menstrual hygiene kits and delivered reproductive health education to more than

For The Good Period Executive Director Kayce Anderson shares a smile with young girls in the village of Mugatuni, Kenya, during a game of Hokey Pokey. The game served as an ice-breaker place at the beginning of a pad distribution and education session. For the Good distributed menstrual hygiene kits and delivered reproductive health education to more than

On Oct. 1, Glenwood Springs resident Kayce Anderson and members of her new nonprofit, For The Good Period, returned to Colorado after spending 10 days working with impoverished young women in rural Tharaka-Nithi County, Kenya.

An agricultural area in the semi-arid foothills east of Mount Kenya, Tharaka-Nithi is one-third the size of Garfield County and yet home to more than 365,000 people. Of those, thousands are school-age girls who have been unable to attend class regularly because of a simple need: access to affordable feminine care items.

Anderson and her team (Molly Secor-Turner of North Dakota State University, photojournalist Kate Lapides and Sharon Secor) traveled to Tharaka-Nithi in hopes of addressing problems of limited resources, lack of education and deep cultural stigma surrounding the issue.

“In this area, there is an acute lack of resources for menstrual hygiene. Historically, the young girls in this part of Kenya simply have not been going to class for approximately one week a month because their families cannot afford pads to help them get through the school day,” Anderson said in an interview shortly after returning from the trip. “This means that girls miss about a quarter of the school year — and that they have been falling behind in their studies or even dropping out.” Click for full article.

Comment